FIRST HALF 2022

Dice Tech Job Report

Tech Hiring Trends by Location, Employer, Role and Skill

For Technologists

The State of the Tech Job Market

Welcome to the 8th edition of the Dice Tech Job Report. Layoffs and hiring freezes in the tech world peppered the news in the late spring and early summer, fueling questions about the state of the job market for tech talent. When we analyzed 3 million tech job postings between January and June 2022 and compared that to job posting data from January through June 2021, as well as historical trends (via Lightcast), we found evidence that is just the opposite: demand for tech talent has continued to grow throughout the first half of this year.

Tech job postings saw month-over-month growth in the first five months of 2022, with June marking the first decline in month-over-month tech jobs since September 2021. Even with the pullback in June, which follows previous seasonal trends, postings for the month came in well above Q1 2022 results.

While the continued strength of the tech job market may come as a surprise to some readers, the results are due to tech hiring maintaining momentum across a wide range of industries. Companies not normally categorized as tech (i.e., those not traditionally referred to as tech companies, but are still investing in technology) continue to recruit and hire tech talent at a rapid pace. These gains outweighed the impact of hiring freezes and layoffs at tech-focused organizations.

The Dice Tech Job Report includes data and analysis of year-over-year growth in tech job postings by location, employer, occupation and tech skill. You’ll find the top tech hiring trends from the first half of 2022 below. Dig into each detailed area of the report to learn more!

Methodology

To present the insights in this report, Dice used job posting data provided by Dice’s partner, Lightcast (formerly known as Emsi Burning Glass), which has a database of more than 1 billion current and historical job postings worldwide. Dice pulled data on July 6, 2022 and analyzed over 3 million tech job postings in the U.S. to gather our specific dataset, which we then filtered for “Information Technology” jobs that fall under “Full Time,” “Part Time” and “Flexible Hours.” We gathered the list of top employers in the “Employers” section by using the above criteria, with an additional filter for job postings that only derive from employer sites. The information in this report is a snapshot of tech job posting data as of July 6, 2022, and backward revisions to prior month’s data may occur from the sources used in this report.

Key Takeaways

Strong sustained demand for tech talent

Demand for tech talent continues to grow at a swift pace, with the number of tech job postings up 45% since the beginning of the year and up 52% compared to the first half of 2021. A hiring spike in May was followed in June by the first month-over-month decline in tech job postings in 2022 (17%).

The decline can be attributed to not only an overcorrection to May’s spike and reaction to talk of inflation and a bear market, but also to a seasonal trend seen in previous years. In 2019, there was an 11% decrease in tech job postings between May and June. Even so, postings are still up 60% in June 2022 compared to June 2021.

YoY tech job posting growth nationwide

Technologists’ preference for remote and hybrid work persists and is keeping newer, smaller tech hubs at the top of the lists of cities and states attracting tech talent. This isn’t to say traditional tech hubs such as Silicon Valley are a thing of the past, though, as they’re very much still thriving.

With high demand for tech talent prevalent across industries, and companies settling into a firmer approach to work environment and schedule expectations, technologists still have opportunities to work anywhere — and they’re doing just that.

Employers need technologists with data-related skills

When it comes to the tech industry’s more lucrative skills, it’s all about the data. According to Dice’s most recent Tech Salary Report, mastery of data storage and processing tools such as HANA, Hadoop and PAAS can translate into superior compensation. Similar data-related skills are among the most in-demand by employers; SQL, Python (used frequently in data analytics) and AWS enjoyed some of the biggest growth in job postings between January and June.

Expect these trends to continue as more organizations gravitate toward storing and processing data in the cloud, which could further spike demand for cloud, AWS, Microsoft Azure and other related skills.

Efficiency requires traditional tech roles with specialized skills

While certain sections of the technology industry have experienced some turbulence this year, leading to hiring slowdowns at some companies, software engineers and developers remain in strong demand. Those who’ve mastered the skills essential for building and maintaining tech stacks and databases, such as SQL, automation and the principles of software development, have a great shot at landing a job anywhere.

But the key is to always keep one’s skills up to date; recruiters and hiring managers can (and should) take steps to ensure that all job candidates are well-versed in the latest and greatest tech; in addition, they should consider training programs to upskill (and retain) current employees, as studies have shown a strong desire on technologists’ part for continuing training and education.

Strong sustained demand for tech talent

Demand for tech talent continues to grow at a swift pace, with the number of tech job postings up 45% since the beginning of the year and up 52% compared to the first half of 2021. A hiring spike in May was followed in June by the first month-over-month decline in tech job postings in 2022 (17%).

The decline can be attributed to not only an overcorrection to May’s spike and reaction to talk of inflation and a bear market, but also to a seasonal trend seen in previous years. In 2019, there was an 11% decrease in tech job postings between May and June. Even so, postings are still up 60% in June 2022 compared to June 2021.

YoY tech job posting growth nationwide

Technologists’ preference for remote and hybrid work persists and is keeping newer, smaller tech hubs at the top of the lists of cities and states attracting tech talent. This isn’t to say traditional tech hubs such as Silicon Valley are a thing of the past, though, as they’re very much still thriving.

With high demand for tech talent prevalent across industries, and companies settling into a firmer approach to work environment and schedule expectations, technologists still have opportunities to work anywhere — and they’re doing just that.

Employers need technologists with data-related skills

When it comes to the tech industry’s more lucrative skills, it’s all about the data. According to Dice’s most recent Tech Salary Report, mastery of data storage and processing tools such as HANA, Hadoop and PAAS can translate into superior compensation. Similar data-related skills are among the most in-demand by employers; SQL, Python (used frequently in data analytics) and AWS enjoyed some of the biggest growth in job postings between January and June.

Expect these trends to continue as more organizations gravitate toward storing and processing data in the cloud, which could further spike demand for cloud, AWS, Microsoft Azure and other related skills.

Efficiency requires traditional tech roles with specialized skills

While certain sections of the technology industry have experienced some turbulence this year, leading to hiring slowdowns at some companies, software engineers and developers remain in strong demand. Those who’ve mastered the skills essential for building and maintaining tech stacks and databases, such as SQL, automation and the principles of software development, have a great shot at landing a job anywhere.

But the key is to always keep one’s skills up to date; recruiters and hiring managers can (and should) take steps to ensure that all job candidates are well-versed in the latest and greatest tech; in addition, they should consider training programs to upskill (and retain) current employees, as studies have shown a strong desire on technologists’ part for continuing training and education.

Monthly U.S. Tech Job Postings

January 2019 through June 2022

Comparisons

QoQ | YoY | 2022 vs. 2021

Q1 2022 vs. Q1 2021
Q2 2022 vs. Q2 2021
June 2022 vs. June 2021
Jan.–June: 2022 vs. 2021

Table of Contents

Tap on a topic to go to that article

Interested in connecting with top tech recruiters and employers?

Share this on social or via email: